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Science & Technology => Tech Talk => Topic started by: Bad Penny on May 16, 2011, 08:04:15 am



Title: Science Television Does It Again: Planet Green Boo-Boo
Post by: Bad Penny on May 16, 2011, 08:04:15 am
Right now I'm watching "Fearless Planet" on the Planet Green channel.  This episode, entitled "Earth Story", began with a geologist saying that molten lava was "rock on fire".  If something is "on fire", that means that it is oxidizing.  Molten lava glows, not because it's oxidizing (which, for the most part, it isn't), but because it's incandescing.  Oxidation is an exothermic chemical reaction, whereas indandescence is an exothermic physical phenomenon which occurs when photons (the quantum particles of electromagnetism) which, as conveyors of thermal energy, excited the electron clouds of the atoms making up the lava to the point that they could no longer crystalise into solids, but could only exist as a fluid liquid, are released as contact with air and/or water lowers the temperature of the lava, the newly freed photons being emitted into space as visible light.  (Be on notice that I am of the school that claims that all solids are crystalline in nature, and that so-called "amorphous solids" are, in fact, hyper-viscous liquids.)

The program further claims that Rodinia was the first supercontinent: there is no evidence for such a statement.  There may well have been supercontinents  prior to Rodinia.  They should have said Rodinia is the first known supercontinent.


Title: Re: Science Television Does It Again: Planet Green Boo-Boo
Post by: Jaerson on July 10, 2011, 09:47:47 am
hmmm...interesting....:) 
Right now I'm watching "Fearless Planet" on the Planet Green channel.  This episode, entitled "Earth Story", began with a geologist saying that molten lava was "rock on fire".  If something is "on fire", that means that it is oxidizing.  Molten lava glows, not because it's oxidizing (which, for the most part, it isn't), but because it's incandescing.  Oxidation is an exothermic chemical reaction, whereas indandescence is an exothermic physical phenomenon which occurs when photons (the quantum particles of electromagnetism) which, as conveyors of thermal energy, excited the electron clouds of the atoms making up the lava to the point that they could no longer crystalise into solids, but could only exist as a fluid liquid, are released as contact with air and/or water lowers the temperature of the lava, the newly freed photons being emitted into space as visible light.  (Be on notice that I am of the school that claims that all solids are crystalline in nature, and that so-called "amorphous solids" are, in fact, hyper-viscous liquids.)

The program further claims that Rodinia was the first supercontinent: there is no evidence for such a statement.  There may well have been supercontinents  prior to Rodinia.  They should have said Rodinia is the first known supercontinent.


Title: Re: Science Television Does It Again: Planet Green Boo-Boo
Post by: Tekoa on July 10, 2011, 08:47:34 pm
Right now I'm watching "Fearless Planet" on the Planet Green channel.  This episode, entitled "Earth Story", began with a geologist saying that molten lava was "rock on fire".  If something is "on fire", that means that it is oxidizing.  Molten lava glows, not because it's oxidizing (which, for the most part, it isn't), but because it's incandescing.  Oxidation is an exothermic chemical reaction, whereas indandescence is an exothermic physical phenomenon which occurs when photons (the quantum particles of electromagnetism) which, as conveyors of thermal energy, excited the electron clouds of the atoms making up the lava to the point that they could no longer crystalise into solids, but could only exist as a fluid liquid, are released as contact with air and/or water lowers the temperature of the lava, the newly freed photons being emitted into space as visible light.  (Be on notice that I am of the school that claims that all solids are crystalline in nature, and that so-called "amorphous solids" are, in fact, hyper-viscous liquids.)

The program further claims that Rodinia was the first supercontinent: there is no evidence for such a statement.  There may well have been supercontinents  prior to Rodinia.  They should have said Rodinia is the first known supercontinent.

Standard; evidence is always denied and only what they say is true.