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"Welcome to OnStar, your vehicle is now ready to be used in a False Flag attack"

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birther truther tenther
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« on: November 27, 2010, 12:31:57 pm »

The following is the background to understand what Enterprise Architecture is, and why it is dangerous to have this controlling every GM vehicle produced in the last few years.


Transcript of Anti-Illuminati Interview: 2009/08/28
http://www.corbettreport.com/articles/20090901_anti-illuminati.htm


Quote
Anti_Illuminati: Now in terms of the false flag aspect of enterprise architecture, keep in mind too that when you think of enterprise architecture, think in terms of blueprinting because that's what it is. And that's what Indira Singh...she herself has used that term and that's what she was working on. Specifically was the, in her own words, the next generation of risk blueprint. And that has every painstaking detail of all systems within a business. That includes the electronics, the network infrastructure, and everything like that. The partner to this is risk management. And you see this all the time. All of the big new world order corporations, you'll find them talking about stuff like this. If you do a search for risk management by itself, you'll probably find tens of thousands of hits on it, maybe more than that.

Let's say, for example, you're incorporating an artificial-intelligence-based architecture to protect a network from cyber attack. Sounds good, right? This software can scan incoming network traffic like a highly advanced firewall and if there's different thtreats that are unprecedented or there's different types of hacker attacks or something, the idea is that this can adapt to real-time attacks and learn new things that were previously unknown to it. And then harden itself to be able to deal with that in the future so it's immune to such attacks. Well the problem with risk management is that not only can it protect you but it can be specifically reversed to amplify risks. It can be used for the exact opposite of that. It can be used to create risks where none existed before. And it can also be used to make existing risks within an enterprise, a business, security risks, whatever...it can make them invisible. It can just say that, "Oh, there's nothing wrong here." when there is something wrong. You have a multifaceted way that this can be implemented. And this ties into 9/11 because ostensibly, the idea behind the interoperability that Ptech was touted as going to provide for the FAA and the Federal Aviation Administration's NAS, which is the National Airspace System, which the documents that talk about that, where this whole thing was engineered before 9/11. The documents from like 1999 from MITRE Corporation. There's 2 different ones from MITRE and 1 from the FAA dot gov website. You can still down download these. When you read the contents of them, they can still be used in a court of law to get people indicted for treason if you know what they're (the documents) talking about.

So anyways, the documents talk about the engineering, the actual use of Ptech to supposedly reconcile all of these former interoperability problems. And that everything was gonna be great and everything was just gonna be made so much more efficient and so forth. Well, the reality of it is is that it didn't create interoperability. You see, the new world order, the criminals that carried this out, when they're talking about interoperability, they're not talking about that for your benefit. They're not talking about it for the benefit of the people. That's for them. That's so they have interoperability. In other words, they have control. All of their people, all of their criminals are on the same page. They all have exclusive access to the system to exploit it however they want to and strip the administrative, supervisory controls from the people who would not otherwise be criminals, who would actually be doing their job to defend the United Stated against an internal threat of hijacked airliners or aircraft that have remotely been seized by this software through their advanced automatic flight systems, like ILS and so forth. So they strip the command and control away and the interoperability is in the hand of the new world order and everyone else is left with a chaotic scene of basically shock and awe. (That) is actually what that was, even back then. It was just total overload. And even what they did, that actually leads into another thing, which I'll get into later, called the OODA Loop. If you wanna really understand 9/11, you need to know what the OODA Loop is. And that's an abbreviation for Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. It's a military term that was developed, it was coined by Col. John Boyd who was a fighter pilot like 50 years ago who had an exemplary dogfighting record of kills. He had like, I can't remember the number, like 84 planes that he shot down using his OODA loop.

Basically, in a nutshell, it is a methodology of outthinking your opponent. It is being able to preempt their actions and act upon where they're going to be so that when you're in the position to attack you're enemy, they're not even prepared to begin to react to your attack. Because they don't even know that you're gonna be there. And that's the methodology that was used on 9/11 against our own Department of Defense systems. That's how they did that.

They overloaded the response/decision, the legitimate command and control that could have otherwise stopped the black op from being executed. And that sets the whole precedent for the entire fraudulent war on terror and all of this, literally terror engineering is what you have. Or like what Indira Singh, in her own words talks about where she says, "The terror economy is alive and well." So, in one respect that's the replacement for the cold war. It's the new permanent enemy so that the new world order can have unlimited money for no bid contracts and to fight illegal wars and to basically enslave everyone, steal all the money so that they can eventually be unchallengeable.

So, the false flags, that whole thing is a very huge subject in terms of where you can go with that. The idea is that you have painstaking details of everything within wherever you have that software. And (this is) allowing you to attack whatever points that you want to. And also, you can set it up to blame whoever you want. And the thing of it is is that this is used in conjunction with the backdoor capability of this stuff.

The back-dooring into enterprise architecture that's based off of Ptech or the like, a PROMIS based program. That Ptech is just a name. You want to use a term that kinda is more encompassing, that could attribute for whatever it could be called. There's a lot of different companies that make the same exact thing. If you do some research, you will find that the current iteration of the actual company Ptech, in the United States, is a company called Intelligile. And they actually have a website that you can go to. And you can tell that that's what it is. Intelligile dot com. It's very interesting that there are no names of anyone on the website as far as who runs the company. And there's no street address. //laughs// And there's no phone number. So you can only E-Mail them if you wanna consult them about their software services. That's kinda interesting.






A7. Enterprise Architects as Innovation Agents: An OnStar Case Study
The role of enterprise architects as change agents in an organization is nothing new.
Enterprise architects, with their broad business understanding, deep technical knowledge
and cross-organization connections, are uniquely qualified to play a lead role in an organization’s
innovation activities. The OnStar enterprise architecture team has been part of the information
technology organization since its inception almost 10 years ago. Enterprise architects link the
business mission, strategy, and processes of the organization to its IT strategy and compose
holistic solutions that address the business challenges of the enterprise.The presentation will:
• Explore the maturation journey of OnStar enterprise architecture.
• Delve into the disciplined practice used for technology innovation in the OnStar EA team
and results achieved to date.
• Provide key learning on enterprise architects as innovation catalysts in the organization.
Sanjay Khunger, Chief Technologist, OnStar Systems & Technology

http://www.metagroup.pl/it/content/1219200/1219215/2010_ea_brochure.pdf



Sanjay Khunger   
Chief Technologist, OnStar Systems & Technology

Sanjay Khunger is a senior technology leader with proven experience in leading transformation programs and delivering business solutions through advanced technology innovation. He has twenty years of progressive experience in Information Technology in global corporations with expertise in technology planning and strategy, business transformation, software architecture and development. He is actively engaged in advancing disciplined management of innovation through internal and external collaboration.

In his current role as Chief Technologist at OnStar, Mr. Khunger is responsible for establishing the information systems technology strategy & architecture. Prior to this role, he managed the design and delivery of IT systems for the OnStar in-vehicle hardware generations.

Mr. Khunger came to General Motors from Xerox Corporation where he oversaw the global enterprise application integration (EAI) architecture. Prior to that, he held product management and architecture leadership positions, and was an IT consultant. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in Computer Science and Masters in Business Administration.

http://agendabuilder.gartner.com/EA12/WebPages/SessionList.aspx?Speaker=2117



The role of enterprise architects as change agents in an organization is nothing new. Enterprise Architects, with their broad business understanding, deep technical knowledge and cross-organization connections, are uniquely qualified to play a lead role in an organization’s innovation activities.
The OnStar Enterprise Architecture team has been part of the Information Technology organization since its inception almost 10 years ago. Enterprise architects link the business mission, strategy, and processes of the organization to its IT strategy and compose holistic solutions that address the business challenges of the enterprise.

The presentation will:
- explore the maturation journey of OnStar Enterprise Architecture
- the disciplined practice used for technology innovation in the OnStar EA team and results achieved to-date
- provide key learnings on Enterprise Architects as innovation catalysts in the organization

http://agendabuilder.gartner.com/EA12/WebPages/SessionDetail.aspx?EventSessionId=816



http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20090150023.pdf

METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR PROVIDING VEHICLE DATA TO THIRD PARTY AUTHORIZED RECIPIENTS

A system and method that reports vehicle data to one or more third parties using an onboard telematics unit. The method includes the steps of selecting a type of data to be reported and identifying a third party to receive the selected type of data. The onboard telematics unit receives a portion of the data that is classified as the type of data to be received by the third party. The vehicle information is then associated with the received data to create a report. The report is then transmitted to the third party using the onboard telematics unit allowing the third party to analyze the report. Several reports for various types of data may be generated to be disseminated to various third parties.


Inventors:
Grau, Thomas P. (Rochester, MI, US)
Khunger, Sanjay (Brighton, MI, US)
Huber, Chester A. (Grosse Pointe Farms, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/952853
Publication Date:
06/11/2009
Filing Date:
12/07/2007
Assignee:
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION (Detroit, MI, US)
Primary Class:
455/466
Other Classes:
701/35
International Classes:
G01M17/007; H04Q7/20

Attorney, Agent or Firm:
General Motors, Corporation C/o Reising Ethington Barnes Kisselle P. C. (P.O. BOX 4390, TROY, MI, 48099-4390, US)
Claims:
1. A method for reporting vehicle data to a third party using an onboard telematics unit, the method comprising the steps of: selecting a type of data to be reported; identifying the third party to receive the type of data from the vehicle; receiving at the onboard telematics unit a portion of the data that is classified as the type of data to be received by the third party; creating a report that includes the vehicle information and the received data; and transmitting the report to the third party using the onboard telematics unit allowing the third party to analyze the repot.

2. A method as set forth in claim 1, wherein the step of transmitting includes the step of transmitting the report to a call center for distribution to the third party.

3. A method as set forth in claim 2, including the step of distributing the report from the call center to the third party.

4. A method as set forth in claim 3, wherein the step of transmitting includes the step of placing a cellular call by the onboard telematics unit to the call center.

5. A method as set forth in claim 4, including the step of receiving authorization to transmit the report prior to the step of transmitting the report.

6. A method as set forth in claim 4, including the step of establishing a transmission of the report to occur after an expiration of a predetermined time period.

7. A method as set forth in claim 4, including the step of setting a transmission of the report to occur after an occurrence of a predefined event.

8. A method as set forth in claim 4, including the step of subsequently changing the third party to another recipient.

9. A method as set forth in claim 1, wherein the selecting and identifying steps are carried out via an access-restricted web page.

10. A method for reporting vehicle data to a plurality of third parties using an onboard telematics unit, the method comprising the steps of: selecting a plurality of types of data to be reported; identifying one of the plurality of third parties to receive each of the plurality of types of data; receiving at the onboard telematics unit portions of the data relating a subset of the plurality of types of data to be received by a portion of the plurality of third parties; creating a group of reports using the vehicle information and each of the portions of data; and transmitting each of the group of reports to each of the portion of the plurality of third parties independently of each other.

11. A method as set forth in claim 10, including the step of transmitting each of the group of reports to a call center for distribution to each of the portion of the plurality of third parties independently of each other.

12. A method as set forth in claim 11, including the step of distributing each of the group of reports from the call center to each of the portion of the plurality of third parties independently of each other.

13. A method as set forth in claim 12, wherein the step of transmitting includes the step of placing a cellular call by the onboard telematics unit to the call center.

14. A method as set forth in claim 13, including the step of receiving authorization to transmit each of the group of reports prior to the step of transmitting.

15. A method as set forth in claim 13, including the step of establishing a predetermined time period after which each of the group of reports is to be transmitted.

16. A method as set forth in claim 13, including the step of establishing a predefined event for each of the group of reports for which each of the group of reports will be transmitted thereafter.

17. A method as set forth in claim 10, wherein the selecting and identifying steps are carried out via an access-restricted web page.

18. A system for reporting vehicle data to a third party, comprising: a vehicle having an onboard telematics unit; and a call center accessible by the telematics unit using wireless data communication via wireless carrier system, said call center including at least one computer configured to provide a website having at least one web page that enables configuration of third party data reporting by a vehicle owner, the web page enabling the vehicle owner to identify one or more types of data to be reported, and to identify one or more third parties selected to receive vehicle data; wherein, in response to configuration of the third party data reporting by the vehicle owner, vehicle data obtained by the telematics unit at the vehicle is sent to the identified third party.

19. A system as defined in claim 18, wherein the call center receives the vehicle data and sends it to the third party along with vehicle information that uniquely identifies the vehicle.

20. A system as defined in claim 18, wherein, in response to configuration of the third party data reporting via the web site, the call center generates a trigger that is sent to the vehicle telematics unit, and wherein, in response to occurrence of the trigger, the vehicle telematics unit obtains the vehicle data and sends it to the call center for transmission to the third party.

Description:
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates generally to the acquisition and use of vehicle data and, more particularly, to gathering such data from a vehicle and providing it to third party recipients such as governmental entities, car dealerships, service stations, for various purposes of relating to the use, performance and service of the vehicle.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The computer systems on board motor vehicles are quite sophisticated. The onboard computers collect data from every aspect of the operation of the vehicle, from the pressure within the tires to the number of misfires that occurs in a particular cylinder of the internal combustion engine. All of this information is stored and may be downloaded when the vehicle is taken to an establishment that is authorized to access the information.

In addition, third party entities offer incentives to owners of vehicles based on the performance of the owner in operating the vehicle. For example, an insurance company may provide an incentive for the number of miles a vehicle travels without the owner thereof making a claim against his or her insurance policy. These incentives do not occur immediately as most owners of vehicles do not contact their insurance provider as soon as certain milestones are met.

Some governmental regulations currently require vehicle owners to have their vehicle emissions periodically checked by a certified testing facility to verify that they do not exceed predetermined limits. Oftentimes, the regulations required that the owners take their vehicles to certified facilities to collect vehicle emission data from the vehicle. The vehicle emissions data is typically collected in one of several different ways. According to one method, the vehicle emissions are measured by a device that is connected to the vehicles tailpipe while the vehicle is being driven on a dynamometer over a driving cycle that simulates typical city driving and includes periods of acceleration, cruise and deceleration. According to another method which is used primarily with newer vehicles, various electronic modules located throughout the vehicle collect vehicle emissions data while the vehicle is being driven. This data can then be transferred from an onboard diagnostic port (OBDII port) on the vehicle to a certified diagnostic machine that is designed to collect such information.

After the vehicle emissions test is complete, the vehicle owner is usually provided with test results in the form of a computer generated report. Some governmental regulations require that the vehicle owner then provide the test results to a designated governmental entity, like a Secretary of State or a Department of Motorized Vehicles, before they are able to register or renew their vehicle's license plates or tags.

As stated above, the vehicle collects numerous parameters and outputs regarding its performance and the use thereof constantly. This data would be much more useful to the owner of the vehicle if this data were able to be disseminated to the authorized recipients of the data in real time or periodically over the life of the vehicle, wherein the periods are shorter than the periods in which a vehicle is maintained or inspected.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, there is provided a method of reporting vehicle data to a third party using an onboard telematics unit. The method includes the steps of selecting a type of data to be reported. A third party is identified to receive the type of data from the vehicle. The onboard telematics unit receives a portion of the data that is classified as the type of data to be received by the third party. The vehicle information is then associated with the received data to create a report. The report is then transmitted to the third party using the onboard telematics unit allowing the third party to analyze the report.

Another aspect of the invention includes a method for reporting vehicle data to a plurality of third parties using an onboard telematics unit. The method includes the steps of selecting a plurality of types of data to be reported. A plurality of third parties are identified to receive each of the plurality of types of data. The onboard telematics unit then receives portions of the data relating a subset of the plurality of the types of data to be received by a portion of the plurality of third parties. The vehicle information is then correlated to each of the portions of data to create a group of reports. Each of the group of reports is then transmitted to each of the portion of the plurality of third parties independently of each other.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, there is provided a system for reporting vehicle data to a third party. The system includes a vehicle having an onboard telematics unit, and a call center accessible by the telematics unit using wireless data communication via wireless carrier system. The call center includes at least one computer configured to provide a website having at least one web page that enables configuration of third party data reporting by a vehicle owner. The web page enables the vehicle owner to identify one or more types of data to be reported, and to identify one or more third parties selected to receive vehicle data. In response to configuration of the third party data reporting by the vehicle owner, vehicle data is obtained by the telematics unit at the vehicle and is sent to the identified third party.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred exemplary embodiments of the invention will hereinafter be described in conjunction with the appended drawings, wherein like designations denote like elements, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing an embodiment of a system capable of utilizing the method described below;

FIG. 2 is a data flow diagram illustrating how data may flow at the time of enrollment and at data sharing events; and

FIG. 3 is a flow chart showing the steps of an embodiment of a method for providing vehicle data to third party recipients.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The method for providing vehicle data described below can be used to conveniently provide designated third party recipients such as automobile dealerships, governmental entities, insurance providers, or the like, with information pertaining to the performance and use of the vehicle. By wirelessly transmitting vehicle data from a vehicle to a call center and then providing that data from the call center to a third party recipient, the present method enables a vehicle owner to maximize the performance of the vehicle and optimize any incentive program available to the owner without having the bring the vehicle into a service center or the like.
Communications System—

With reference to FIG. 1, there is shown an exemplary operating environment that comprises a mobile vehicle communications system 10 and that can be used to implement the method disclosed herein. Communications system 10 generally includes a vehicle 12 , one or more wireless carrier systems 14 , a land communications network 16 , a computer 18 , and a call center 20 . It should be understood that the disclosed method can be used with any number of different systems and is not specifically limited to the operating environment shown here. Also, the architecture, construction, setup, and operation of the system 10 and its individual components are generally known in the art. Thus, the following paragraphs simply provide a brief overview of one such exemplary system 10 ; however, other systems not shown here could employ the disclosed method as well.

Vehicle 12 is depicted in the illustrated embodiment as a passenger car, but it should be appreciated that any other vehicle including motorcycles, trucks, sports utility vehicles (SUVs), recreational vehicles (RVs), marine vessels, aircraft, etc., can also be used. Some of the vehicle electronics 28 is shown generally in FIG. 1 and includes a telematics unit 30 , a microphone 32 , one or more pushbuttons or other control inputs 34 , an audio system 36 , a visual display 38 , and a GPS module 40 as well as a number of vehicle system modules (VSMs) 42 . Some of these devices can be connected directly to the telematics unit such as, for example, the microphone 32 and pushbutton(s) 34 , whereas others are indirectly connected using one or more network connections, such as a communications bus 44 or an entertainment bus 46 . Examples of suitable network connections include a controller area network (CAN), a media oriented system transfer (MOST), a local interconnection network (LIN), a local area network (LAN), and other appropriate connections such as Ethernet or others that conform with known ISO, SAE and IEEE standards and specifications, to name but a few.

Telematics unit 30 is an OEM-installed device that enables wireless voice and/or data communication over wireless carrier system 14 and via wireless networking so that the vehicle can communicate with call center 20 , other telematics-enabled vehicles, or some other entity or device. The telematics unit preferably uses radio transmissions to establish a communications channel (a voice channel and/or a data channel) with wireless carrier system 14 so that voice and/or data transmissions can be sent and received over the channel. By providing both voice and data communication, telematics unit 30 enables the vehicle to offer a number of different services including those related to navigation, telephony, emergency assistance, diagnostics, infotainment, etc. Data can be sent either via a data connection, such as via packet data transmission over a data channel, or via a voice channel using techniques known in the art. For combined services that involve both voice communication (e.g., with a live advisor or voice response unit at the call center 20 ) and data communication (e.g., to provide GPS location data or vehicle diagnostic data to the call center 20 ), the system can utilize a single call over a voice channel and switch as needed between voice and data transmission over the voice channel, and this can be done using techniques known to those skilled in the art.

According to one embodiment, telematics unit 30 utilizes cellular communication according to either GSM or CDMA standards and thus includes a standard cellular chipset 50 for voice communications like hands-free calling, a wireless modem for data transmission, an electronic processing device 52 , one or more digital memory devices 54 , and a dual antenna 56 . It should be appreciated that the modem can either be implemented through software that is stored in the telematics unit and is executed by processor 52 , or it can be a separate hardware component located internal or external to telematics unit 30 . The modem can operate using any number of different standards or protocols such as EVDO, CDMA, GPRS, and EDGE. Wireless networking between the vehicle and other networked devices can also be carried out using telematics unit 30 . For this purpose, telematics unit 30 can be configured to communicate wireless according to one or more wireless protocols, such as any of the IEEE 802.11 protocols, WiMAX, or Bluetooth. When used for packet-switch data communication such as TCP/IP, the telematics unit can be configured with a static IP address or can set up to automatically receive an assigned IP address from another device on the network such as a router or from a network address server.

Processor 52 can be any type of device capable of processing electronic instructions including microprocessors, microcontrollers, host processors, controllers, vehicle communication processors, and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). It can be a dedicated processor used only for telematics unit 30 or can be shared with other vehicle systems. Processor 52 executes various types of digitally-stored instructions, such as software or firmware programs stored in memory 54 , which enable the telematics unit to provide a wide variety of services. For instance, processor 52 can execute programs or process data to carry out at least a part of the method discussed herein.

Telematics unit 30 can be used to provide a diverse range of vehicle services that involve wireless communication to and/or from the vehicle. Such services include: turn-by-turn directions and other navigation-related services that are provided in conjunction with the GPS-based vehicle navigation module 40 ; airbag deployment notification and other emergency or roadside assistance-related services that are provided in connection with one or more collision sensor interface modules such as a body control module (not shown); diagnostic reporting using one or more diagnostic modules; and infotainment-related services where music, webpages, movies, television programs, videogames and/or other information is downloaded by an infotainment module (not shown) and is stored for current or later playback. The above-listed services are by no means an exhaustive list of all of the capabilities of telematics unit 30 , but are simply an enumeration of some of the services that the telematics unit is capable of offering. Furthermore, it should be understood that at least some of the aforementioned modules could be implemented in the form of software instructions saved internal or external to telematics unit 30 , they could be hardware components located internal or external to telematics unit 30 , or they could be integrated and/or shared with each other or with other systems located throughout the vehicle, to cite but a few possibilities. In the event that the modules are implemented as VSMs 42 located external to telematics unit 30 , they could utilize vehicle bus 44 to exchange data and commands with the telematics unit.

GPS module 40 receives radio signals from a constellation 60 of GPS satellites. From these signals, the module 40 can determine vehicle position that is used for providing navigation and other position-related services to the vehicle driver. Navigation information can be presented on the display 38 (or other display within the vehicle) or can be presented verbally such as is done when supplying turn-by-turn navigation. The navigation services can be provided using a dedicated in-vehicle navigation module (which can be part of GPS module 40 ), or some or all navigation services can be done via telematics unit 30 , wherein the position information is sent to a remote location for purposes of providing the vehicle with navigation maps, map annotations (points of interest, restaurants, etc.), route calculations, and the like. The position information can be supplied to call center 20 or other remote computer system, such as computer 18 , for other purposes, such as fleet management. Also, new or updated map data can be downloaded to the GPS module 40 from the call center 20 via the telematics unit 30 .

Apart from the audio system 36 and GPS module 40 , the vehicle 12 can include other vehicle system modules (VSMs) 42 in the form of electronic hardware components that are located throughout the vehicle and typically receive input from one or more sensors and use the sensed input to perform diagnostic, monitoring, control, reporting and/or other functions. Each of the VSMs 42 is preferably connected by communications bus 44 to the other VSMs, as well as to the telematics unit 30 , and can be programmed to run vehicle system and subsystem diagnostic tests. As examples, one VSM 42 can be an engine control module (ECM) that controls various aspects of engine operation such as fuel ignition and ignition timing, another VSM 42 can be a powertrain control module that regulates operation of one or more components of the vehicle powertrain, and another VSM 42 can be a body control module that governs various electrical components located throughout the vehicle, like the vehicle's power door locks and headlights. According to one embodiment, the engine control module is equipped with on-board diagnostic (OBD) features that provide myriad real-time data, such as that received from various sensors including vehicle emissions sensors, and provide a standardized series of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) that allow a technician to rapidly identify and remedy malfunctions within the vehicle. As is appreciated by those skilled in the art, the above-mentioned VSMs are only examples of some of the modules that may be used in vehicle 12 , as numerous others are also possible.

Vehicle electronics 28 also includes a number of vehicle user interfaces that provide vehicle occupants with a means of providing and/or receiving information, including microphone 32 , pushbuttons(s) 34 , audio system 36 , and visual display 38 . As used herein, the term ‘vehicle user interface’ broadly includes any suitable form of electronic device, including both hardware and software components, which is located on the vehicle and enables a vehicle user to communicate with or through a component of the vehicle. Microphone 32 provides audio input to the telematics unit to enable the driver or other occupant to provide voice commands and carry out hands-free calling via the wireless carrier system 14 . For this purpose, it can be connected to an on-board automated voice processing unit utilizing human-machine interface (HMI) technology known in the art. The pushbutton(s) 34 allow manual user input into the telematics unit 30 to initiate wireless telephone calls and provide other data, response, or control input. Separate pushbuttons can be used for initiating emergency calls versus regular service assistance calls to the call center 20 . Audio system 36 provides audio output to a vehicle occupant and can be a dedicated, stand-alone system or part of the primary vehicle audio system. According to the particular embodiment shown here, audio system 36 is operatively coupled to both vehicle bus 44 and entertainment bus 46 and can provide AM, FM and satellite radio, CD, DVD and other multimedia functionality. This functionality can be provided in conjunction with or independent of the infotainment module described above. Visual display 38 is preferably a graphics display, such as a touch screen on the instrument panel or a heads-up display reflected off of the windshield, and can be used to provide a multitude of input and output functions. Various other vehicle user interfaces can also be utilized, as the interfaces of FIG. 1 are only an example of one particular implementation.

Wireless carrier system 14 is preferably a cellular telephone system that includes a plurality of cell towers 70 (only one shown), one or more mobile switching centers (MSCs) 72 , as well as any other networking components required to connect wireless carrier system 14 with land network 16 . Each cell tower 70 includes sending and receiving antennas and a base station, with the base stations from different cell towers being connected to the MSC 72 either directly or via intermediary equipment such as a base station controller. Cellular system 14 can implement any suitable communications technology, including for example, analog technologies such as AMPS, or the newer digital technologies such as CDMA (e.g., CDMA2000) or GSM/GPRS. As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, various cell tower/base station/MSC arrangements are possible and could be used with wireless system 14 . For instance, the base station and cell tower could be co-located at the same site or they could be remotely located from one another, each base station could be responsible for a single cell tower or a single base station could service various cell towers, and various base stations could be coupled to a single MSC, to name but a few of the possible arrangements.

Apart from using wireless carrier system 14 , a different wireless carrier system in the form of satellite communication can be used to provide uni-directional or bi-directional communication with the vehicle. This can be done using one or more communication satellites 62 and an uplink transmitting station 64 . Uni-directional communication can be, for example, satellite radio services, wherein programming content (news, music, etc.) is received by transmitting station 64 , packaged for upload, and then sent to the satellite 62 , which broadcasts the programming to subscribers. Bi-directional communication can be, for example, satellite telephony services using satellite 62 to relay telephone communications between the vehicle 12 and station 64 . If used, this satellite telephony can be utilized either in addition to or in lieu of wireless carrier system 14 .

Land network 16 may be a conventional land-based telecommunications network that is connected to one or more landline telephones and connects wireless carrier system 14 to call center 20 . For example, land network 16 may include a public switched telephone network (PSTN) such as that used to provide hardwired telephony, packet-switched data communications, and the Internet infrastructure. One or more segments of land network 16 could be implemented through the use of a standard wired network, a fiber or other optical network, a cable network, power lines, other wireless networks such as wireless local area networks (WLANs), or networks providing broadband wireless access (BWA), or any combination thereof. Furthermore, call center 20 need not be connected via land network 16 , but could include wireless telephony equipment so that it can communicate directly with a wireless network, such as wireless carrier system 14 .

Computer 18 can be one of a number of computers accessible via a private or public network such as the Internet. Each such computer 18 can be used for one or more purposes, such as a web server accessible by the vehicle via telematics unit 30 and wireless carrier 14 . Other such accessible computers 18 can be, for example: a service center computer where diagnostic information and other vehicle data can be uploaded from the vehicle via the telematics unit 30 ; a client computer used by the vehicle owner or other subscriber for such purposes as accessing or receiving vehicle data or to setting up or configuring subscriber preferences or controlling vehicle functions; or a third party repository to or from which vehicle data or other information is provided, whether by communicating with the vehicle 12 or call center 20 , or both. A computer 18 can also be used for providing Internet connectivity such as DNS services or as a network address server that uses DHCP or other suitable protocol to assign an IP address to the vehicle 12 .

Call center 20 is designed to provide the vehicle electronics 28 with a number of different system back-end functions and, according to the exemplary embodiment shown here, generally includes one or more switches 80 , servers 82 , databases 84 , live advisors 86 , as well as an automated voice response system (VRS) 88 , all of which are known in the art. These various call center components are preferably coupled to one another via a wired or wireless local area network 90 . Switch 80 , which can be a private branch exchange (PBX) switch, routes incoming signals so that voice transmissions are usually sent to either the live adviser 86 by regular phone or to the automated voice response system 88 using VoIP. The live advisor phone can also use VoIP as indicated by the broken line in FIG. 1. VoIP and other data communication through the switch 80 is implemented via a modem (not shown) connected between the switch 80 and network 90 . Data transmissions are passed via the modem to server 82 and/or database 84 . Database 84 can store account information such as subscriber authentication information, vehicle identifiers, profile records, behavioral patterns, and other pertinent subscriber information. Data transmissions may also be conducted by wireless systems, such as 802.11x, GPRS, and the like. Although the illustrated embodiment has been described as it would be used in conjunction with a manned call center 20 using live advisor 86 , it will be appreciated that the call center can instead utilize VRS 88 as an automated advisor or, a combination of VRS 88 and the live advisor 86 can be used.
Method for Providing Vehicle Data—

Referring to FIG. 2, a diagram illustrating the flow of data between the vehicle owner, the telematics service provider, and third party recipients, is shown at 100 . The vehicle owner 102 (i.e., actual owner, a lessee, or other authorized subscriber) may transmit configuration information through an enrollment event or process as indicated by the solid arrows. Information is transmitted to the telematics service provider 104 either directly from the vehicle owner vehicle 12 , via its telematics unit 30 , or it may access the telematics service provider via an online account, represented by an access-restricted account page on a website 106 . This website can be hosted on the computer 18 or at the call center 20 . Using the Internet to connect to this website 106 , data types 108 , definitions of events 110 , and third party entities 112 are identified and/or selected by the vehicle owner 102 . Once the owner is enrolled, communication and data are shared bidirectionally between each of these sources of information, as is indicated by the dashed arrows in FIG. 2.

When configured via account page 106 , access is preferably gained via a password-protected login that limits access to the vehicle owner 102 . The account page can include checkboxes associated with each of the different types of data which enables the owner 102 to opt-in or opt-out of a particular third party data reporting. This could allow the owner to specify that emissions information be provided to the appropriate governmental vehicle licensing agency (e.g., the department of motorized vehicles), but to opt-out of providing mileage information to their insurance agency. Upon selection of a particular data type (e.g., emissions data), the owner can then be given the ability to identify the third party(ies) to which that information is to be sent, and the conditions under which it is sent (e.g., how often). Optionally, the third party information can be automatically set based on prior stored information associated with the vehicle owner or the vehicle. For example, where the owner selects diagnostic information such as DTCs to be sent to third parties, the system can automatically identify the dealership from which the vehicle was purchased as the intended third party recipient, and this information can be obtained from a customer delivery record or the like.

The data types 108 that a vehicle owner 102 may want to share with third party entities 112 may include odometer readings, emissions output, trouble codes, oil life, tire pressure, vehicle data logger, or the like. The frequency on which data is shared between the vehicle 12 and the third party entities 112 may be set by the vehicle owner 102 in a manner which seems appropriate to the vehicle owner 102 . Examples of the frequency in which a data sharing event would occur include monthly, quarterly, annually, at an occurrence of an event (a trigger), after a specific amount of time at an expiration date of a subscription, or the like. If a vehicle owner 102 does not wish to share data with a third party entity, that data may be never transmitted to the third party entities 112 . Types of third party entities 112 that may benefit the vehicle owner 102 by having the data of the vehicle 12 prior to visits to service stations and the like include insurance companies, government entities, suppliers of components, dealerships, servicing entities, infotainment providers, or the like. Data may be transmitted to the vehicle owner 102 through vehicle diagnostic emails, through the website login that the vehicle owner 102 may utilize, or directly through the telematics unit 30 in the vehicle 12 .

Turning now to FIG. 3, there is shown a flow chart demonstrating an embodiment of a method 200 that provides vehicle data to third party entities 112 . In general, the method 200 receives vehicle data requests, retrieves vehicle data from at least one vehicle system module VSM 42 , uses vehicle hardware 28 to wirelessly transmit the vehicle data to the call center 20 , and then makes the data available to one of a plurality of third party entities 112 , such as insurance companies, government entities, dealerships or the like, in order to accurately identify a performance and use of the vehicle 12 without having the vehicle 12 be brought to a service center. “Vehicle data” broadly includes any information that is representative of, or in some way pertains to, the performance of the vehicle 12 , the use of the vehicle 12 , the mileage that the vehicle 12 travels, DTCs, diagnostic execution test records, sensor readings, vehicle location (e.g., GPS data), infotainment usage, etc. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that many other types of data collected by the vehicle 12 may be incorporated into the method 200 .

The method begins at 202 . It is first determined whether the telematics unit 30 is activated at 204 . If not, the method 200 is terminated and returns at 206 . If the telematics unit 30 is activated, it is determined whether the vehicle owner or subscriber 102 has opted into the reporting of vehicle data at 208 . If not, the method then returns at 206 and is terminated. If the vehicle owner 102 has opted for automatic reporting according to the present method 200 , the vehicle owner 102 selects the data to be reported at 210 . The vehicle owner 102 then identifies the third party entities 112 that will receive that particular data at 212 . It is then determined whether there are more types of data to be reported at 214 . While it is contemplated that each type of data to be reported would be sent to a single third party entity 112 , it is appreciated that one type of data may be sent to a plurality of third party entities 112 . If so, the method loops back at 216 where the same data to be reported is selected at 210 and another third party entity is identified at 212 to receive the data.

The method 200 also uses loop 216 when the vehicle owner 102 chooses to select different types of data 108 at 210 to be sent to different third party entities 112 at 212 . In this manner, the present method 200 allows a vehicle owner 102 to send several different types of data to several different types of third party entities 112 . By way of example, a third party entity 112 such as an insurance company may receive odometer readings. A service entity is a third party entity 112 that may receive oil life data or tire pressure data, whereas a government entity may be a third party entity 112 that receives emissions outputs as data types.

If the vehicle owner 102 is finished matching data types with third party entities, the method 200 then waits for a trigger to occur for each type of data at 218 . A trigger may be simply a frequency of data sharing 110 (FIG. 2), or it may be a specific event that occurs. By way of example, an event that occurs in a non-periodic fashion is the misfire of a cylinder of the internal combustion engine of the vehicle 12 . If the same cylinder misfires at a frequency which is determined to be a malfunction, a trigger may occur to identify a service entity, as a third party entity 112 that the internal combustion engine needs to be serviced. Likewise, the trigger may be a periodic measurement, e.g., measuring the odometer for the life cycle of the oil. In this regard, the trigger can be a specific trigger sent to the vehicle via its telematics unit 30 for the purpose of generating the third party report at the appropriate time, or could be an existing trigger or one used for other purposes such a periodic diagnostic reporting.

Once a trigger has occurred, the data associated with the trigger is sent to the telematics unit at 220 . Data relating to the event is associated with the vehicle information at 222 by combining it or aggregating it with the vehicle information. The vehicle information can include information used to uniquely identify the vehicle and may include a subscription number and/or a vehicle identification number. In some instances, such as for fleets of vehicles, the information may only generally identify the vehicle, such as by make and model or engine. The association of the data which was obtained at the occurrence of a trigger in combination with the vehicle information constitutes a rep ort. If authorization for automatic delivery is not given a request to authorize the transmission of the report is produced. Once authorized, the telematics unit 30 then transmits the report to the call center 20 at 224 . The call center 20 is the telematics service provider 104 of FIG. 2. The call center 20 then distributes the report to the appropriate third party entity 112 at 226 . It is then determined whether all the reports have been distributed by the telematics unit 30 at 228 . If not, the method returns to step 226 through a loop 230 and distributes another report. If so, the method returns to step 218 and waits for another trigger to occur at 206 .

The transmission of the report to the call center at step 224 by the telematics unit 30 includes the telematics unit 30 initiating a cellular call from wherever the vehicle 12 is located to the call center 20 . This transmission of the report occurs either at the expiration of a predetermined time or after the occurrence of a predefined event such as a trigger. In another embodiment, this step 224 can be eliminated with the telematics unit 30 being configured to transmit the report to the third party without going through the call center (e.g., direct transmission from the vehicle to the third party). This can be an option where, for example, the owner 102 does not want the data shared with the call center 20 . For this embodiment, the third party contact information can be provided in advance to the telematics unit, for example, during setup of the trigger used to initiate data collection and generation of the report.

At anytime during the ownership of the vehicle 12 , the vehicle owner 102 may change or replace a third party entity 112 with another should the vehicle owner 102 desire. The vehicle owner 102 could change the third party entity 112 either through the account page 106 that allows the vehicle owner 102 to access the Internet system supporting the method 200 or it may contact the call center 20 using the onboard telematics unit 30 .

The vehicle 12 will be collecting a plurality of types of data. At any given point, one type of data may be appropriate to send to one third party entity and the other may not have matured to a reporting status. Therefore, the onboard telematics unit 30 will only generate a report for that specific type of data that has matured and send it to the corresponding third party entity 112 once a report has been generated by the onboard telematics unit 30 . It may be appreciated by one skilled in the art that there may be any number of combinations of reports being generated nearly simultaneously or in succession and transmitted to the appropriate third party entity 112 associated with that specific type of data. The method need not send every type of data to every third party entity 112 as such transmissions of data may be over burdensome and, in some instances, inappropriate.

It is to be understood that the foregoing description is not a definition of the invention, but is a description of one or more preferred exemplary embodiments of the invention. The invention is not limited to the particular embodiment(s) disclosed herein, but rather is defined solely by the claims below. Furthermore, the statements contained in the foregoing description relate to particular embodiments and are not to be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention or on the definition of terms used in the claims, except where a term or phrase is expressly defined above. Various other embodiments and various changes and modifications to the disclosed embodiment(s) will become apparent to those skilled in the art. All such other embodiments, changes, and modifications are intended to come within the scope of the appended claims.

As used in this specification and claims, the terms “for example,” “for instance,” “such as,” and “like,” and the verbs “comprising,” “having,” “including,” and their other verb forms, when used in conjunction with a listing of one or more components or other items, are each to be construed as open-ended, meaning that that the listing is not to be considered as excluding other, additional components or items. Other terms are to be construed using their broadest reasonable meaning unless they are used in a context that requires a different interpretation.
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2010, 12:32:26 pm »

NOW HIRING!

http://www.gm-jobs.com/job/Detroit-OnStar-Sr_-Systems-Architect-Job-MI-48201/997892/

OnStar Sr. Systems Architect Job
Apply now »

Date: Oct 27, 2010

Location: Detroit, MI, US
8-OnStar Sr. Systems Architect-INF0001093
OnStar IT Sr System Engineer

General Description
As a team member of OnStar IT, the Sr Systems Engineer (SE) is the technical expert for an application domain and the systems that support it. Utilizing knowledge of the applications and technical expertise, the Sr SE is involved in all aspects of designing and delivering a solution; from providing and analyzing system requirements, providing high level estimation of IT solutions for new and/or enhanced OnStar services, to active participation in assigned IT projects from start through deployment. Work involves a great deal of creativity and initiative as well as a very high level of independent judgment.

Tasks

The Sr System Engineer will work closely with all IT stakeholders to perform the following tasks using a combination of solid systems development practices, strong analytical and problem-solving skills, and teamwork techniques:

System Architecture Development

· Developing system requirements and architectural design

· Ensuring compliance with internal as well as industry IT Standards process

· Contributing in reviews of technical deliverables and architectural design

· Contributing in resolution of technical issues and risks

· Working closely with supplier and IS&S technical teams

· Supporting project estimation and planning

· Supporting product and supplier selection activities (RFP)

Technical Contribution

· Staying current on modern and emerging telematics technologies: wireless, embedded, and distributed computing systems.

· Providing detailed technical and scientific analyses on products, technologies and methods.

Architecture and Standards Management

· Document and provide guidance on architecture and standards

· Support development of Enterprise Architecture (GM and OnStar), including Enterprise-Wide Technical Architecture

· Participate in GM architecture activities

· Ensure compliance with IT Standards process

General

· Participates in the selection of new employees

· Trains, develops and evaluates employees

· Supervises the complete system implementation including design, flow charts, programming and testing

· Reports to management on progress developments

· Assists and advises subordinates in contacts with users on large or complex systems

· Regular contact with others outside the work group
Maintains current knowledge of computer systems and recommends improvements

Qualifications

Experience/Education Requirements:

Basic Required

* Bachelor of Science degree in Information Systems, Computer Science, or related field
* 10-15 years experience developing and architecting distributed, component-based, service-oriented solutions for an enterprise
* Experience with SOA and Web Service stacks, standards, products, and technologies.
* Experienced in following industry-proven software engineering practices such as SEI CMMI and agile methods like FDD
* Experience with IT outsourcing and offshore development models
* Experience developing and delivering highly available and complex systems
* Experience with commercial and open-source web server, application server platforms and enterprise middleware, including MOM, TP Monitors, system management and security systems
* Experience with Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (OOAD)

Basic Preferred

* Advanced degree in Information Systems, Computer Science, or related field
* Experience in developing automotive/vehicle telematics server application, multimedia application and telematics gateway following industry standard
* Experience in developing push, presence and PoC application for SMS or IMS infrastructure
* Knowledge on end-to-end vehicle telematics architectures
* Knowledge on mobile and wireless computing architectures
* Knowledge of location based and navigation services including different technologies and software products used in design and delivery of services
* Knowledge of voice applications with hands on experience with Avaya, Nuance or Cisco
* Experience in design and development of with various with Navigation and location based services
* Knowledge of navigation and location based products/services offered by ESRI, deCarta, MapInfo, Google, BING
* Knowledge of OpenLS, KML, GeoRSS and other related standards/best practices
* Experience working on Traffic, Weather and geospatial applications

Skill Requirements:

* Highly developed knowledge of several programming languages, operating systems, system management technologies, industry standards, and security procedures
* Extensive software development experience, including: Java, C, C++
* Extensive software development for Weblogic Application Server
* Experience implementing enterprise solutions using LDAP, JMS, SNMP, XML, SOAP, Struts, Axis, WebLogic, Oracle, JEE
* Experience in VXML, CCXML, SRGS and MRCP
* Experience in design and delivery of large global IVR solution at enterprise level using in-house and/or hosted solutions

* Knowledge of short and mid-range wireless technologies, including: 802.11 and Bluetooth.
* High level of sound logic and analytical ability where problems are unusual and extremely difficult
* Highly developed oral and written communications skills
* High level of interpersonal skills to work effectively with others, motivate employees and elicit work output
* Excellent written and verbal communication skills
* Highly developed presentation skills
* Familiarity with telecommunications technology, including H.323, SS7, SIP, VOIP
* Familiarity with public safety technology, including APCO P25, TETRA
* Familiarity with enterprise data systems, including RDBMS, data warehousing, datamarts, OLTP, OLAP
* Knowledge of analog and digital long-range wireless signaling and communication protocols including AMPS, CDMA2000, SMS, CDMA 1xRTT, EV-DO, WiMAX

Location: 400 Renaissance Center, Detroit, MI

Primary Location
US-MI-Detroit

Posting Date
:Oct 26, 2010 Nov 25, 2010


Nearest Major Market: Detroit
Job Segments: Architecture, Automotive, Cisco, Creative, Data Warehouse, Database, Developer, Embedded, Engineer, Engineering, Information Security, Information Systems, Information Technology, IT Architecture, Java, Middleware, Mid-Range, Multimedia, Network, Open Source, Oracle, Outside Sales, RFP, Sales, Software Engineer, System Administrator, Systems Engineer, Technology, Telecom, Telecommunications, Test Engineer, Testing, XML
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2010, 12:38:55 pm »

Quote
Inventors:
Grau, Thomas P. (Rochester, MI, US)
Khunger, Sanjay (Brighton, MI, US)
Huber, Chester A. (Grosse Pointe Farms, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/952853
Publication Date:
06/11/2009
Filing Date:
12/07/2007
Assignee:
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION (Detroit, MI, US)
Primary Class:
455/466
Other Classes:
701/35
International Classes:
G01M17/007; H04Q7/20


Chester A. Huber Jr.

(click on hyperlinked name for source)



BACKGROUND
Chester A. Huber Jr., Chet served as the President of OnStar Corp., a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Motors Company (also known as Motors Liquidation Company) from June 1995 to October 2009. Mr. Huber served as General Manager of the OnStar Division at General Motors Corporation from June 1995 to December 1999. He joined GM's Electro-Motive Division as a Co-OpEngineering student in 1972 and served a variety of engineering, operations, and marketing roles before joining ... OnStar including Director of the aftermarket business, General Director of Aftermarket Parts and Services, and General Director of Sales, Marketing and Product Support for the Electro-Motive Division. He has been a Director of XM Satellite Radio Inc. since January 2002. He served as a Director of SIRIUS XM Radio Inc. from August 2008 to May 27, 2010. He served as a Director of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. from January 2002 to July 2008. Mr. Huber served as a Faculty Member at Benedictine University's MBA Program. In 2005, he was appointed by the Bush Administration to serve on a Federal Advisory Committee for the Center for Disease Control's Injury Prevention and Control. In 1994, Mr. Huber was selected by the U.S. Department of Defense and General Motors as the first Industrial Fellow to attend the National Defense University's Industrial College of the Armed Forces in Washington, D.C. In May 2005, he was the First Industrial student inductee into the U.S. Department of Defense Industrial College of Armed Forces Hall of Fame. Mr. Huber graduated in June 1995 with a Master of Science degree in National Resource Strategy. Mr. Huber is a graduate of General Motors Institute (GMI) with a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering. Upon Graduation from GMI (now Kettering University), he was selected as a GM fellow and attended Harvard University where he was awarded a Master's degree in Business Administration. Mr. Huber was presented with an Honorary Doctorate degree of Engineering from Kettering University.

Board member connections (Source Bloomberg):
http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/relationship.asp?personId=663434



http://www.boozallen.com/news/33015098

Booz Allen Vice President Named to NASA Advisory Board
Keith Hall accepts a prominent role in overseeing GPS support for U.S. military interests—and for the needs of a global population.

Comprised of a constellation of about two dozen U.S. government satellites, the Global Positioning System (GPS) was built by the DoD to aid in national security. Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) data provided by the GPS was intended to support defense operations such as precision strike capabilities.

“But GPS has become an integral part of the entire global economy,” says Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President Keith Hall. “GPS technology can be found in everything from cars and airplanes to ambulances and cell phones. Citizens as well as governments rely on it worldwide for precise location and time references that not only improve efficiency and effectiveness, but can also save lives.”

With the potential of the GPS having such an enormous global impact, the President established the National Space-Based PNT Executive Committee in 2005 to advise federal agencies on GPS-related issues. Chaired by the Deputy Secretaries of Defense and Transportation, the committee includes officials from the Departments of State, Commerce, and Homeland Security, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and NASA.

Shortly afterward, NASA created the National Space-Based PNT Advisory Board to provide independent advice to the Executive Committee and oversee U.S. space-based PNT policy, planning, program management, and funding.

In March 2007, Hall was appointed to the 24-member PNT Advisory Board. His experience with space system acquisition and understanding of the GPS policy environment were principal considerations in his selection.

“The PNT Advisory Board provides a wide range of stakeholders and subject matter experts to advise the Executive Committee,” Hall says. “The stature of the expert board members, including key representatives from industry, international organizations, and close allies, ensures that advice the board proffers will be carefully considered.”

Providing Broad Access While Addressing New Challenges

From agriculture and emergency health services to earthquake prediction and package delivery, PNT data can increase productivity, enhance public safety, and improve quality of life for billions of people.

Because the GPS signal can be easily received, free PNT data—including highly accurate, standardized location and time information—is available to anyone equipped with a GPS receiver. Precise GPS time signals derived from atomic clocks are even being applied to the management of power grids.

PNT combines three capabilities:

    *
      Positioning – Precise determination of one’s location and orientation in two or three dimensions
    *
      Navigation – Accurate determination of a current position and ability to correct course, orientation, and speed to attain a desired position anywhere in the world
    *
      Timing – Ability to calculate the accurate time anywhere on Earth

Collectively, space-based PNT capabilities provide position, velocity, and timing data that enables every user to operate on the same reference system and timing standard.

There are a number of key challenges in PNT, however, that the board will have to consider. “First, we must determine the capabilities that need to be provided in the future, as DoD considers a replacement GPS capability for the aging constellation of satellites now in orbit,” says Hall.

“Second, how can we best craft a cooperative global GPS capability as other nations deploy PNT capabilities of their own? And finally, we must determine how the national security use of PNT capabilities can be ensured going forward.”

Hall leads Booz Allen’s work for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), intelligence, and space markets. He served for three decades in the public sector as the Director of the NRO and Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Air Force. As NRO director, Hall was responsible for the acquisition and operation of all U.S. space-based reconnaissance and intelligence systems. At the Air Force, he supervised space-related issues with emphasis on policy, strategy, and planning.

PNT Advisory Board Members

    *
      James R. Schlesinger (Chair), MITRE Board of Trustees Chairman
    *
      Bradford Parkinson (Vice Chair), Stanford University Professor
    *
      Phil Boyer, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
    *
      Captain Joseph D. Burns, U.S. Navy (Ret.), United Airlines
    *
      Ann Ciganer, U.S. GPS Industry Council
    *
      Susan M. Cischke, Ford Motor Company
    *
      Per K. Enge, Stanford University Professor
    *
      Martin C. Faga, MITRE Former President and CEO
    *
      Keith R. Hall, Booz Allen Hamilton
    *
      Robert J. Hermann, Global Technology Partners, LLC
    *
      Chester A. Huber, OnStar Corporation
    *
      David Logsdon, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
    *
      General Lance Lord, USAF (Ret.), Former Commander, USAF Space Command
    *
      Timothy A. Murphy, Boeing Company
    *
      Terence J. McGurn, CIA (Ret.), Private Consultant
    *
      General James P. McCarthy, USAF (Ret.), Air Force Academy Professor
    *
      Ruth Neilan, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    *
      Charles R. Trimble, U.S. GPS Industry Council International Committee Chairman
    *
      Gerhard Beutler, International Association of Geodesy, Switzerland
    *
      Arve Dimmen, Norwegian Coastal Administration
    *
      Suresh V. Kibe, Indian Space Research Organization
    *
      Keith McPherson, Airservices Australia
    *
      Hiroshi Nishiguchi, Japan GPS Council
    *
      Captain Richard A. Smith, Royal Navy (Ret.), International Association of Institutes of Navigation, England
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2010, 12:40:36 pm »

Quote
Inventors:
Grau, Thomas P. (Rochester, MI, US)
Khunger, Sanjay (Brighton, MI, US)
Huber, Chester A. (Grosse Pointe Farms, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/952853
Publication Date:
06/11/2009
Filing Date:
12/07/2007
Assignee:
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION (Detroit, MI, US)
Primary Class:
455/466
Other Classes:
701/35
International Classes:
G01M17/007; H04Q7/20

A blogger for an XM Radio Forum reposted this DetNews article that has been flushed down the memory hole.  I am only reposting this mainstream article because the original source has been erased.  The Detroit News and the journalist Anita Lienert are the authors of this following quote:

Quote
'RadioMarks' takes aim at audiophiles

Device bookmarks songs you hear in car and sends them to your home computer

By Anita Lienert / Special to The Detroit News

The Santana song "Soul Sacrifice" is the inspiration for a new concept that combines the General Motors OnStar in-vehicle communications system with satellite radio.

Thomas P. Grau, the 44-year-old OnStar business development manager for satellite radio services, was on his way to work in a Cadillac Seville when he got the idea.

He heard the Santana song and wondered if it was the version they played at Woodstock.

"I sat in the parking lot at work and, sure enough, it was the Woodstock version," Grau said. "But it wasn't enough for me. I wanted to keep that experience going at work.

"I thought, 'Wouldn't it be great if that song could be bookmarked in my(computer) mailbox? Wouldn't it be cool if I could access Santana fan clubs or get driving directions to Woodstock? My grandmother lived by there and Woodstock was important to me, since I'm a Baby Boomer."

Shortly afterwards, Grau began working on a way to provide all of that information to OnStar and XM radio subscribers. He calls his concept "RadioMarks."

It's not yet available to the public, but it's a simple idea that's ready for production and should make a lot of audiophiles happy when it comes to fruition.

Here's how it works: The "info" button on your vehicle's audio system would be reprogrammed to bookmark songs. You would access this function by pressing and holding the info button.

Press the info button a second time and the OnStar system, a two-way wireless connection, would send the bookmark to your personal computer via e-mail.

Grau says the concept could also be used to notify listeners that their favorite songs or artists are playing on another XM radio channel -- along with the elapsed time on the song, so you could determine whether it's worth changing stations.

"The idea for the improvement on XM radio is based on the selfish motivation of wanting to know more," Grau said, showing off the concept on a computer at the General Motors Proving Ground in Milford in late June.

"The idea is to make it simple and make it tailored to the tastes and preferences of the individual listener."

Nice, the Onstar Enterprise Architecture will have access to your home computer as totally admitted to by one of the inventors of "providing vehicle data to third party access"!  Guys and gals, this is downright Big Brother, and this was written in 2003!

So not only can TPTB use Onstar Enterprise Architecture to false flag your automobile, they can also plant bogus evidence on your home computer to convince a sheeple jury that you plotted that false flag the whole time.

This is too bats**t insane!!!!!
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2010, 12:41:10 pm »

Tony Scott on Enterprise Architecture

CIO Magazine has an interview with Tony Scott on Enterprise Architecture. One of the things Tony does is make sure none of his peers hear the term “enterprise architecture.” In the end, this is all about simplifying IT infrastructures and processes by creating a context and structure within which IT operates. For it to work, that context must be based on the business. Tony talks about simplicity and gives an example from OnStar:

    We don’t ever want IT to be the thing that holds GM back. And to the extent that you have complexity in your IT environment, you tend to make it more difficult to change or take advantage of new opportunities. Companies that operate without an architectural approach end up like Gulliver, tied down by tens of thousands of Lilliputian strings and wires. If he’s going to move, you have to cut 10,000 strings. If the company practices enterprise architecture, you will have fewer strings to cut and more freedom of movement.

    One of the best places that we put this to use was over at OnStar. We worked with them, trying to understand the new customer services they were going to put in place. We created a map of the business activities and which IT systems, either current or proposed, would fulfill those activities. Which systems will provide enrollment for OnStar subscribers? Which ones will provide support for emergency calls?

    We discovered some gaps where OnStar had assumed that there was already a certain system functionality that we didn’t have yet. Then there were also a couple of cases where there were overlaps where the same function was provided in two different systems requiring us to choose which system should actually provide this functionality. Without this enterprise architecture process, we would have gone much further down the development road without realizing these problems. We probably would have paid systems integrators to develop those systems, and only when we got to testing or even to deployment would we have discovered these gaps and overlaps. So by engaging this process up front, we got to the goal line faster.
    From GM’s Cure for Complexity - Architecture - CIO Magazine Sep 1,2004
    Referenced Wed Sep 08 2004 18:56:43 GMT-0600

SOURCE: http://www.windley.com/archives/2004/09/tony_scott_on_e.shtml

FULL ARTICLE HERE:
http://www.cio.com.au/article/180306/gm_cure_complexity/
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hipvilla
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 02:27:11 pm »

thanks for your nice information.


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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2011, 04:49:27 pm »

I knew there was something Orwellian about this technology.
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